What's the Difference between Wet and Dry Cat Food

May 29, 2015 - A comparison of wet versus dry cat food, and the pros and cons of each.
When you bring home a kitty it can be difficult to choose between wet vs. dry cat food. Both are ultimately excellent sources of nutrition if you serve her an appropriate balance, and some pet parents decide to blend the two. Of course, each type of food presents its own advantages and disadvantages. Here's what you need to know so you can decide what's best for her.
When we made our picks for best cat foods, we examined all varieties: dry, wet, dehydrated, freeze-dried, and homemade.
Most vets will recommend wet cat food for your feline friend or maybe even a mix of wet and dry. It is important to know, though, that quality brands of wet and dry foods will both provide complete nutrition for your cat. Remember to always follow the advice of your vet. , we can make specific recommendations based on your cat’s needs!
Because dry cat food contains more starch and more carbohydrates than canned cat food, some have argued that a diet containing large amounts of carbohydrates is unnatural for a cat that is anatomically and physiologically designed to be a carnivore. Carbohydrates constitute between 30 percent and 40 percent of dry cat food. Some have been concerned that this unnatural diet is harmful to cats and leads to increased incidence of diabetes. Wet cat food, on the other hand, is high in protein and more similar to a natural carnivore diet. However, my problem is money! I am keeping with the same brand they were eating when they ate dry which is Eagle Pack's Holistic series for cats. The wet food goes for about ~$1.00 for a 5.5 ounce cat. My problem is if I fed them what is written to feed a cat about 4 to 6 ounces a day PER cat, I'd be using two cans a day...which means my 24 cans will only last me two weeks ...which then means I'll be spending $60-70.00 per month instead of my 17.00 per month of dry cat food. That's a big difference for a poor person!!!In the study, Robert Backus, assistant professor and director of the Nestle Purina Endowed Small Animal Nutrition Program at MU, and his team of researchers compared a colony of cats in California raised on dry food with a colony of cats in New Zealand raised on canned food. After comparing glucose-tolerance tests, which measures blood samples and indicates how fast glucose is being cleared from the blood after eating, researchers found no significant difference between a dry food diet and a wet food diet. They also compared the results between cats less than three years of age and cats older than three. The MU veterinarian indicated that allowing cats to eat enough to become overweight is more detrimental to their health than the type of food they eat. After comparing glucose-tolerance tests, which measures blood samples and indicates how fast glucose is being cleared from the blood after eating, researchers found no significant difference between a dry food diet and a wet food diet....So speaking of cat food, I am sure all of us have pondered on the question about whether we should choose wet food, dry kibble or a combination of both for our little feline furries. In fact, there have been many debates and studies on proper nutrition and diet for cats. The truth is that there is really no right answer to it.Like most cat lovers, Petcentric readers are always looking for the best ways to care for and feed their cats. One question that comes up time and again is, “Should I feed my cat wet food or dry food?”