Feline Urinary SO canned cat food | Royal Canin Veterinary Diet

Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Feline Urinary SO Moderate Calorie dry cat food.
Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Urinary SO Moderate Calorie Dry Cat Food is: Made with wholesome ingredients Formulate for cats with feline urinary tract diease Prevents bladder stones Increases urine volume Maintains a healthy weight Gummy and chewy Cleans teeth and gums Fortified with vitamins,…
Rated 5 out of 5 by Tiababa from Needed & Helpful product We had to put 3 of our 4 cats on a urinary tract food and our Vet recommended Royal Canin
My cat was forming crystals in his bladder so for the rest of his life I'm to feed him urinary health cat food. My vet had me feed him Royal Canin® Urinary SO Cat Food but after a few bags of it I recently decided to go with Purina Focus Adult Urinary Tract Health Formula dry cat food. Hopefully it will do just as well. Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Feline Urinary S/O in Gel Canned Cat Food: Prescription wet canned diet for urinary tract and bladder health support in cats.Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Feline Urinary S/O Olfactory Attraction Dry Cat Food: Aromatic, prescription dry cat food for supporting UT & bladder health.Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Urinary SO is a delicious and nutritious food for cats that prevents irritation of the urinary tract.
My female miniature poodle had bladder stones removed surgically and was put on a diet of Hill's multipurpose C/D. I started feeding it to my Yorkie and he was eating it but the kernels were large and I thought I would try the Royal Canin. They did not have the small dog so I fed him the large regular SO. He started vomiting and getting loose stool. I took it back to the vet and they ordered the small bite. While I was waving for the small bite to come in I switched to Hill's again with no problem. I picked up the small bite when it came in and the Yorkie got loose stool then diarrhea and vomiting. Last night I took him to emergency because of black stool. He was diagnosed with blood in his urinary tract. There was no signs of parasites and they did blood work which looked normal. The vet put him on special medication for a week. I suspect that the food has caused the problem and after spending $240 I am taking the food back to the vet.But the foods, none of them , "dissolve" crystals. They help create a healthy environment while the moisture keeps the bladder well flushed, so eventually, the urine stays free of debris, because the crystals are peed out, and not too many are forming, not because they are being "dissolved". I agree I misspoke when I said "dissolve" as "flush" is a better term. I know about the genetics as I have read pretty extensively on it and which is why it comes up out of nowhere as the cat gets older...mine didn't show signs until the age of 5. I disagree regarding the solution is simply "hydration" as some cats have chemical imbalances that lead to variances in urinary pH. It's physiologically impossible for all cats (just like humans) to have the same molecular makeup, so treating a symptom or condition uniformly is of course a ridiculous proposition...and where I have huge issues with the one-size-fits-all remedy being pushed on this forum by Pierson's posse. I do agree that feeding a cat a corn-laden diet long term is not the right alternative, but it clearly is over the short term if one wants to correct the urinary tract acidity imbalances....although some cats may be unable to achieve the proper acidity without being on one of the prescription diets. It's certainly feasible if there is an issue biologically and without any other viable alternatives would not hesitate to use it to keep my cat alive and somewhat healthy. As an FYI, some cats do tolerate some brands better than others. Purina ProPlan does not contain corn (some corn starch and wheat gluten to create/thicken the gravy) like Royal Canin or Hills' Prescription Diet and while it does contain some salt, it's the 11th ingredient listed...just before Caramel Color which is used sparingly in food products to color up from gray. I can already hear the tin-foil hats shrieking but would urge rational cat owners to read (a lot of varying sources) and be open to all sides of the argument...ultimately utilizing what's best overall for your particular cat's health.My 4 year old cat has been diagnosed with urinary tract infection since being a kitten and as such, has to eat food that is supposedly designed to accommodate this challenge. The vet has several brands, but Royal Canin was singled out by the vet as being the better. We balance his diet with a combination of wet and dry products, either 50/50 mix or, as we do now, wet food 4 times a day (3tbsp) with a dry food bin there for him to pick at when he fancies.Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Urinary SO Moderate Calorie Dry Cat Food is: Made with wholesome ingredients Formulate for cats with feline urinary tract diease Prevents bladder stones Increases urine volume Maintains a healthy weight Gummy and chewy Cleans teeth and gums Fortified with vitamins,…