Home Remedies for Hairballs in Cats | PoC

9 Home Remedies for Hairballs in Cats | Home Remedies 4 Any
Grooming comes naturally to our cats, and aren't we thankful for it? However, there remains a serious flip side to this otherwise wonderful quality that felines possess. Cat keepers know this by the name of hairballs. But, worry not, as we've lined up some stellar home remedies to help you sort out this nuisance.
Home Remedies For Hairballs in Cats - The Safe and the Not So Safe
Petroleum-based laxatives that have been approved by the FDA for use in veterinary medicine include brand names like Drs. Foster and Smith Hairball Remedy, Felaxin, Kat-A-Lax, Lax’aire, Laxatone, to name a few. As with the homeopathic products and some of the foods, the vaseline basically coats both the hair in the cat’s stomach and intestines, helping it to pass through the animal’s gastrointestinal tract, and also lubricates the colon and stool itself. Home Remedies For Hairballs in Cats - The Safe and the Not So Safe.What are some home remedies for hairballs in catsWhat are some home remedies for hairballs in cats? Reference
Cats, known for their finicky bathing habits, may swallow loose hair as they lick themselves clean. Usually, the hair passes easily through the cat's digestive system but occasionally it clumps, forming an hairball. When this occurs, the cat may try to vomit up the hairball. According to "The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats," this is not a serious condition, but if your cat suffers from chronic hairballs, a home remedy may offer some relief.Petroleum-based laxatives that have been approved by the FDA for use in veterinary medicine include brand names like Drs. Foster and Smith Hairball Remedy, Felaxin, Kat-A-Lax, Lax’aire, Laxatone, to name a few. As with the homeopathic products and some of the foods, the vaseline basically coats both the hair in the cat’s stomach and intestines, helping it to pass through the animal’s gastrointestinal tract, and also lubricates the colon and stool itself.If, despite your best preventative efforts, you notice your cat exhibiting any of the hairball symptoms listed on the left side of this page, it’s pretty easy to offer your cat hairball relief. If your cat hasn’t already vomited the hairball on her own, you can simply give her an increased dose of commercial hairball remedy. Usually, this means a daily dose until the hairball is expelled or the symptoms pass, but follow the instructions on the package. Too much petroleum can interfere with your cat’s absorption of vitamin A, so you want to be careful not to give her too large a dose. For the same reason, you shouldn’t feed your cat plain petroleum jelly, the complications will outweigh the hassles of hairballs. Other home remedies can also be dangerous and should be avoided. Cod liver oil supplies too much of vitamins A and D, and plain mineral oil can be inhaled and cause pneumonia.Petroleum-based laxatives that have been approved by the FDA for use in veterinary medicine include brand names like Drs. Foster and Smith Hairball Remedy, Felaxin, Kat-A-Lax, Lax’aire, Laxatone, to name a few. As with the homeopathic products and some of the foods, the vaseline basically coats both the hair in the cat’s stomach and intestines, helping it to pass through the animal’s gastrointestinal tract, and also lubricates the colon and stool itself.Cats groom themselves several times a day not only because they are clean animals by nature, but also as a means of removing the loose hairs that accumulate. Due to the frequency of their grooming, cats will often get hairballs as the hairs collect in their stomach. This accumulation eventually leads to the cat vomiting up the hairballs on your floors or furniture. To ease the cat's discomfort and keep your house hairball-free, try out any one of many different home remedies for cat hairballs.Before adopting any type of home remedy, make sure you take your cat to the veterinarian. With a full check-up, you can ensure that you cat isn’t suffering from any other type of medical condition that is contributing to your cat’s digestive problems and the number of hairballs in their stomach.