Folic Acid for Veterinary Use - Wedgewood Pet RX

Dietary deficiencies are pesky stumbling blocks on the path to kitty well-being
In cats, deficiency of folic acid can sometimes lead to anemia, a major concern. Folic acid is vital for producing oxygen within the bloodstream, so without sufficient levels of it a cat may become significantly more susceptible to the red blood cell disorder. Folic acid helps create hemoglobin, a protein important for oxygen transportation within the blood.
Dogs and Cats. Folic acid supplementation is used in animals at risk for folate deficiency, particularly animals with small intestinal disease or malabsorption.
Cats require more vitamins B1 (thiamin), B6 (pyridoxine), folic acid and B3 (niacin) than dogs. Vitamin B6 may be important for stopping viruses. A researcher at Purdue University has shown that adding vitamin B6 to FeLv and lymphosarcoma cells in culture dramatically inhibits their growth. Apr 7, 2012 - Folic acid is pretty good for cats and one of the reasons it's put in most high quality cat foodFolic Acid For Pets - The Pet BeastroThe Pet BeastroJan 14, 2013 - Folic acid is most commonly known as Vitamin B9 and it needed most ..
Vitamin B12 deficiency produces the same type of anemia as folic acid deficiency. Deficiencies are rare, however. Diets containing milk and other animal products are good sources of vitamin B12. Plant sources contain little or no vitamin B12. Neither animals nor plants manufacture the vitamin, however. Bacteria produce all the vitamin B12 in the world. Animals with bacteria producing the vitamin in their intestinal tract, absorb and store the vitamin in their tissues. Thus meat in pet foods becomes a source of the vitamin. Enough vitamin B12 is stored in the body to supply an animal's needs for three years. Intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 is totally dependent on a protein, intrinsic factor. Gastric mucosa and the pancreas (in dogs) produce intrinsic factor. Intrinsic factor binds to vitamin B12 and is necessary for its absorption in the small intestine. Deficiency of intrinsic factor results in vitamin B12 deficiency and anemia develops. Such deficiencies are rare in dogs and cats. Deficiency of the vitamin is also possible with a large increase in small intestinal bacteria; bacteria consume the diet’s vitamin B12 and little is left to absorb. Disease of the ileum, where absorption of the vitamin takes place, also can cause a deficiency. Low dietary concentration of vitamin B12 sometimes causes deficiency. Vitamin B12 requirements for dogs and cats are unknown. Suggested requirements for the growing and adult dog are 1 and 0.5 micrograms per kilogram body weight per day, respectively. For the growing and adult cat the suggested requirements are 0.8 and 0.4 micrograms per kilogram body weight per day, respectively. There is no confirmed toxicity associated with large amounts of the vitamin. Dogs and cats sometime receive injections of the vitamin to stimulate appetite and improve general well-being; such treatment has no proven efficacy. Carnivorous Rex Cats when they eat grass because they lack the necessary enzymes to break down vegetable matter. Does this mean your cat likes to throw up? Well, while it's doubtful that kitty enjoys the act, this up-chucking sensation may eliminate all indigestible matter from the cat's , making it feel a whole lot better. This is important because cats eat their prey as is, including both the edible and inedible parts (fur, bones, feathers, etc.). It's in the Juice Much like mother's milk, the juices in grass contain folic acid. This is an essential vitamin for a cat's bodily functions and assists in the production of , the protein that moves oxygen in the blood. Think of it as a wheat grass shake for your kitty (let's hope they like it more than you do). Nature's Laxative Another theory is that grass acts as a natural , counteracting any cases of . As any cat owner knows, cats regularly throw up and leave lovely, wet little fur ball presents around the house. But when the fur moves deep into the digestive tract, kitty needs a little help to break it down and pass it out the other end. Call it a sixth sense or just intuition, but your cat knows that a little bit of grass may just go a long way in cleaning out its system (and may save you a trip to the veterinarian). So all in all, ingesting grass is not a bad thing. Some even believe cats eat grass to relieve sore throats. We would like to point one thing out, though. Regardless of whether you have an indoor or an outdoor cat, you should make sure that all your household plants are of the non-toxic variety. You may also want to buy a small tray of grass just for the cat, or . This will give your cat an alternative to the outdoor grass and landscaping, the eating of which could lead to accidental ingestion of pesticides, herbicides, or chemicals that may have been used to treat your (or your neighbor's) yard. Some scientists wonder if there’s another, precise reason for a cat’s occasional taste for grass. They reason that the juices in grass contain folic acid. This is known to be an essential vitamin for a cat's bodily functions. It also assists in the production of hemoglobin, the protein that moves oxygen in the blood. So grass eating, in this theory, may be like a trip to the health store, or a fresh juice bar.Much like mother's milk, the juices in grass contain folic acid. This is an essential vitamin for a cat's bodily functions and assists in the production of , the protein that moves oxygen in the blood. Think of it as a wheat grass shake for your kitty (let's hope they like it more than you do).