Does Dry Cat Food Really Cause Feline Diabetes | Petnet

Carb-laden dry cat food is the cause of feline diabetes in the first place.
As an added bonus, I changed his obese brother's diet at the same time to Fancy Feast and no dry, since they eat at the same time and routinely switch food dishes no matter what I do. At his heaviest he was almost 25 lbs, even when closely watching his calorie intake and feeding only 2x/day (no free feeding)! Prior to changing him to his brother's diabetic diet I was able to get him down to 21-22 lbs. but still far from a healthy weight. He was the one I was afraid would become diabetic, btw. The last time he visited the vet he came in at just under 14 lbs. and she said that he was now a healthy weight. Yes, he is a big cat but no longer obese.
Diabetic Cats - Fancy Feast flavors containing no Wheat gluten , low carbohydrate Do not fee ANY DRY FOOD
When my now 9-year old cats were kittens, I wish I had fed them differently. I wish I had offered them both canned and dry food instead of only kibble. I now have a cat that looks at me like I’ve lost my marbles if I put canned food down in front of him. His look suggests, “What is this slop you are giving me?!?” Should I ever need to have him on a canned only diet (as we suggest for diabetic felines) I’d be in big trouble. If your cats are kittens, do yourself a favor and be sure to offer canned food in addition to kibble. My question is the Purina DM dry food suppose to be bad for a diabetic catShould diabetic cats be fed dry food, canned food, or semi moist?dry food, you can obtain low-carbohydrate, dry diabetes cat food from the veterinarian.
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
Unlike dogs, cats have a very good chance of becoming non-diabetic if certain dietary changes are made and their insulin resistant factors are controlled (like obesity, etc). It is very common for a cat to require insulin for only a few months and then go into diabetic remission. The two most important recommendations for cats with diabetes are no carbohydrates and no dry food! Diabetic cats should eat a high–protein, moderate fat and low/no carbohydrate food for the best chance of remission from their diabetes. The desired levels may vary if your cat has other medical conditions, but in general, I recommend that at least 45% of your cat's calories come from protein, 25 to 30% from fat and only 10% (or less) of their calories come from carbohydrates. and are great options.