Cat Food For Diabetic Cats Find

How to Make Healthy Homemade Cat Food (Bulk) for Diabetic and Non Diabetic Cats thumbnail
The only association that is statistically significant (the confidence interval does not include 1) is the comparison of dry food and wet food only in cats of normal weight. A couple of others are close, but it is impossible to tell if these would achieve statistical significance under different circumstances. The more important question, however, is do the pattern of results make sense? If dry food increases the risk of diabetes, shouldn’t this be the case for cats of all body weights? Of is the role of obesity so great that it swamps any effect of diet, so diet only shows up as a risk factor in cats of normal weight? The authors are very reasonable and circumspect in how they address these findings, and they are clearly aware that the implications of these results need to be sorted out in the context of the existing literature and, ideally, through further research.
I receive many emails each week asking for food recommendations for diabetic cats. Answers:
Because dry cat food contains more starch and more carbohydrates than canned cat food, some have argued that a diet containing large amounts of carbohydrates is unnatural for a cat that is anatomically and physiologically designed to be a carnivore. Carbohydrates constitute between 30 percent and 40 percent of dry cat food. Some have been concerned that this unnatural diet is harmful to cats and leads to increased incidence of diabetes. Wet cat food, on the other hand, is high in protein and more similar to a natural carnivore diet. The Best Food For Cats With Diabetes TutorThe Best Food For Cats With Diabetes TutorFood For Diabetic Catscan Cats Get Pink Eye
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
Q: What is hypoglycemia, and how do I handle it?
Hypoglycemia is the term for low blood sugar. Diabetics have the opposite problem, high blood sugar, called hyperglycemia. Diabetics only develop hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is they are managed incorrectly. You will read some scarey stories about diabetics that “hypo” and have all kinds of problems as a result. However, no cat ever needs to have any episodes of hypoglycemia if it is managed without dry cat food and sugar supplements (like Karo, pancake syrup etc.). I have managed hundreds of diabetic cats and have never had one that was on my protocol has had an episode of hypoglycemia that produced these signs."Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
To best control your diabetic cat's sugar levels, it is important to feed consistent meals at fixed times each day. Ideally meals are timed to the insulin injection—for example, feed your cat and give insulin within 1 hour to help combat the blood sugar rise from the food. So the insulin works effectively at each meal, it is best that each feeding contains the same amount of calories and the same ingredients so that the insulin will have an expected effect.