Dave's Pet Food for Cats with Diabetes Dave's Pet Food

I receive many emails each week asking for food recommendations for diabetic cats. Answers:
COLUMBIA, Mo. – Although society is accustomed to seeing Garfield-sized cats, obese, middle-aged cats can have a variety of problems including diabetes mellitus, which can be fatal. The causes of diabetes mellitus in cats remain unknown although there has been a strong debate about whether a dry food diet puts cats at greater risk for diabetes. A new study from a University of Missouri-Columbia veterinarian suggests that weight gain, not the type of diet, is more important when trying to prevent diabetes in cats.
Semi-moist cat foods are not recommended for diabetic cats because they often contain high amounts of sugar.
Cats are carnivores – for this reason, their ability to break down carbohydrates is not as well developed as their human counterparts. It is particularly important in the case of diabetic felines that their diet is primarily made up of proteins and very few carbs. Similarly, it’s best to choose a over a dry food. In this article we will help you understand all of the above and also take a look at the best wet cat food for diabetic cats.Now that we've covered the basics of diabetes in the feline species, it's time to uncover some of the best wet food for diabetic cats.Believe it or not, dry food is one of the leading causes of diabetes in cats. Therefore, dry food cannot be considered a diabetes cat food.
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
Unlike dogs, cats have a very good chance of becoming non-diabetic if certain dietary changes are made and their insulin resistant factors are controlled (like obesity, etc). It is very common for a cat to require insulin for only a few months and then go into diabetic remission. The two most important recommendations for cats with diabetes are no carbohydrates and no dry food! Diabetic cats should eat a high–protein, moderate fat and low/no carbohydrate food for the best chance of remission from their diabetes. The desired levels may vary if your cat has other medical conditions, but in general, I recommend that at least 45% of your cat's calories come from protein, 25 to 30% from fat and only 10% (or less) of their calories come from carbohydrates. and are great options. To best control your diabetic cat's sugar levels, it is important to feed consistent meals at fixed times each day. Ideally meals are timed to the insulin injection—for example, feed your cat and give insulin within 1 hour to help combat the blood sugar rise from the food. So the insulin works effectively at each meal, it is best that each feeding contains the same amount of calories and the same ingredients so that the insulin will have an expected effect."Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."
"Feline diabetes is not the natural fate of hundreds of thousands of pet cats world-wide. It is, rather, a human-created disease that is reaching epidemic proportions because of the highly artificial foods that we have been feeding our feline companions for the past few decades. Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all."