Simply microchipping your pet isn't enough

The American Animal Hospital Association does not maintain a database of microchips of its own
A microchip is about the size and shape of a grain of rice and is placed underneath your cat’s skin between the shoulder blades. Microchip implantation takes only a few minutes and is very safe. Each microchip is unique and carries vital information about your cat—including your name, address, and contact information. When a microchip is implanted, the owner is given a registration form to complete. Registering the number on the microchip includes your cat in a national pet recovery database. Veterinary hospitals, animal shelters, and animal control offices across the country are equipped with special electronic scanners that can detect the microchip and read the identification number. If a lost cat is picked up by animal control or found by a good Samaritan and presented to a veterinarian, a quick scan of the microchip reveals the identification number.
Companion Animal Care Center provides microchipping services for dogs and cats through the Home Again national pet recovery database
It is important to understand that a pet microchip is not a GPS device providing real time tracking capabilities. Rather, a cat microchip is a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) device. Unlike a GPS device, a cat microchip doesn't require power, and it is activated by an animal shelter or veterinarian waving an RFID scanner across a cat's body where the microchip is embedded. The scanner activates an identification number, which is linked in a database to your ownership information. Register your pet's microchip (any brand) in the World Wide Microchip Database. Ensure your dog or cat's safety 24/7. Register now.May 13, 2015 - In most states in Australia, it is now compulsory for dogs and cats to be microchipped and registered in an approved database [9]Get a HomeAgain microchip for pets & join our membership program that enhances a pet ..
It is important to understand that a pet microchip is not a GPS device providing real time tracking capabilities. Rather, a cat microchip is a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) device. Unlike a GPS device, a cat microchip doesn't require power, and it is activated by an animal shelter or veterinarian waving an RFID scanner across a cat's body where the microchip is embedded. The scanner activates an identification number, which is linked in a database to your ownership information.Definitely! A study of more than 7,700 stray animals at animal shelters showed that dogs without microchips were returned to their owners 21.9% of the time, whereas microchipped dogs were returned to their owners 52.2% of the time. Cats without microchips were reunited with their owners only 1.8% of the time, whereas microchipped cats went back home 38.5% of the time. (Lord et al, JAVMA, July 15, 2009) For microchipped animals that weren't returned to their owners, most of the time it was due to incorrect owner information (or no owner information) in the microchip registry database--so don't forget to register and keep your information updated.Microchipping for cats and dogs also makes it easy for owners to update contact information. If you move or change phone numbers, it takes only minutes to log into the microchip database and update your pet’s contact information. This is much faster and less expensive than having to purchase new tags.Microchipping for cats and dogs also makes it easy for owners to update contact information. If you move or change phone numbers, it takes only minutes to log into the microchip database and update your pet’s contact information. This is much faster and less expensive than having to purchase new tags.It is important to understand that a pet microchip is not a GPS device providing real time tracking capabilities. Rather, a cat microchip is a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) device. Unlike a GPS device, a cat microchip doesn't require power, and it is activated by an animal shelter or veterinarian waving an RFID scanner across a cat's body where the microchip is embedded. The scanner activates an identification number, which is linked in a database to your ownership information.It is important to understand that a pet microchip is not a GPS device providing real time tracking capabilities. Rather, a cat microchip is a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) device. Unlike a GPS device, a cat microchip doesn't require power, and it is activated by an animal shelter or veterinarian waving an RFID scanner across a cat's body where the microchip is embedded. The scanner activates an identification number, which is linked in a database to your ownership information.