Cat having trouble with hairballs

Hairballs in Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and Remedies - Pets WebMD
If your cat is having trouble with hairballs, your vet might want to do blood tests to make sure your cat's liver and kidneys are performing as they should. The vet might also recommend an ultrasound or take x-rays to make sure there are no blockages that could harm your cat. Vet Jeff Johansson, writing for , details how a cat brought in with an elevated respiratory rate, loss of appetite, and increased salivation was suffering from a hairball firmly lodged in his esophagus, which was only discovered after x-rays. Johansson and his team were able to push the hairball back into the stomach, where it eventually passed naturally. In less severe cases, a laxative might work to pass the hairball, but laxatives should only be administered under the direction of a vet. In more severe cases, surgery might be the only way to remove a particularly stubborn mass of hair.
If your cat is having trouble with hairballs, your vet might want to do blood tests to make sure your cat's liver and kidneys are performing as they should
Most cats vomit 1-2 hairballs each month, with long-haired cats or those that groom excessively having hairballs more often. Very frequent hairballs or vomiting without hairballs could be signs of additional digestive trouble, including cancer, and pet owners should take their cats to the vet to be sure there are no underlying problems. If your cat continues to have trouble with hairballs, talk to your vet about what you should do to improve this.When Hairballs Become Hazardous - The Daily CatMost cats cough up fur balls from time to time, but did you know that hairballs can be fatal
If your cat is really having trouble with a hairball, you can help her out by giving her a hairball remedy. It can be found at most of the pet stores. It is basically a laxative and lubricant which is going to help her move the hairball along through the intestines. Hairballs are an unpleasant fact of cat ownership, and while it is necessary for cats to expel hairballs, there are steps owners can take to minimize them without compromising their pet's health.Why Cats Have HairballsCats are frequent groomers, and their rough tongues catch loose hair, which is then swallowed. While most hair passes harmlessly through the cat's digestive tract, some does become matted and stuck in the stomach, where it forms a hairball. When the ball is large enough, it must be vomited away or else it could cause intestinal blockages and impaction, which can not only be uncomfortable, but could be fatal if left untended.Most cats vomit 1-2 hairballs each month, with long-haired cats or those that groom excessively having hairballs more often. Very frequent hairballs or vomiting without hairballs could be signs of additional digestive trouble, including cancer, and pet owners should take their cats to the vet to be sure there are no underlying problems.Reducing Hairballs and VomitingThere are a number of tricks that can minimize hairballs. Even if a cat is not frequently passing hairballs, these techniques can be helpful:Hairballs and vomiting are never the best part of owning a cat, but by taking appropriate steps, both can be minimized while maximizing the cat's well-being.Hairballs are an unpleasant fact of cat ownership, and while it is necessary for cats to expel hairballs, there are steps owners can take to minimize them without compromising their pet's health.Why Cats Have HairballsCats are frequent groomers, and their rough tongues catch loose hair, which is then swallowed. While most hair passes harmlessly through the cat's digestive tract, some does become matted and stuck in the stomach, where it forms a hairball. When the ball is large enough, it must be vomited away or else it could cause intestinal blockages and impaction, which can not only be uncomfortable, but could be fatal if left untended.Most cats vomit 1-2 hairballs each month, with long-haired cats or those that groom excessively having hairballs more often. Very frequent hairballs or vomiting without hairballs could be signs of additional digestive trouble, including cancer, and pet owners should take their cats to the vet to be sure there are no underlying problems.Reducing Hairballs and VomitingThere are a number of tricks that can minimize hairballs. Even if a cat is not frequently passing hairballs, these techniques can be helpful:Hairballs and vomiting are never the best part of owning a cat, but by taking appropriate steps, both can be minimized while maximizing the cat's well-being.Depending on the cause of your cat’s wheezing, treatment range moderately priced to expensive. The average cost if your cat is having trouble with hairballs is $150. Heartworms can be dangerous, and pricey to take care of. The average cost for treating heartworms can be $1000. To treat your cat for lungworm it will cost about $250.