Cat Deterrents for your Garden:

The deterrents that emit sound to scare cats away would be great, but will it hurt my dog?
This is the first time independent research has shown that an ultrasonic device can have a deterrent effect on cats. CATWatch offers a pragmatic partial solution for non-cat owners who wish to deter cats from entering their gardens“. Andy Evans, RSPB
Cat Deterrents for your Garden:
Keep dogs and cats away with Liquid Fence Dog and Cat Repellent. Just spray the repellent on the areas where your pets, your neighbor's pets, and strays don't belong lawns, flowerbeds, garden beds, trees, shrubs and trash containers. With Liquid Fence Dog and Cat Repellent, their favorite spots become areas to avoid, not visit. Because the spray is made with natural plant oils, it can be safely used on your plants. The effectiveness of Liquid Fence Dog and Cat Repellent will act as a training deterrent for pets and strays as long as it is present. Use initially, to train and break a pattern of habitual behavior, Liquid Fence Dog and Cat Repellent may need to be applied more frequently. As the animal's behavior is changed, the application frequency can be reduced. Before spraying on objects such as outdoor furniture or decking, test a small area for staining acceptability. Recommended for outdoor use only. Turn Catscram into a plug-in and forget cat deterrent that will keep cats out of your garden no problem at all.Pick up a cat houseplant deterrent spray at your local pet store. Bitter apple tends to be very effective.Safe houseplant cat deterrents include pine cones nestled into the top of the soil. Cats usually don’t appreciate the feel or the smell.
An "electronic" cat deterrent sounds fearsome, but in fact these devices are completelyharmless to cats and other animals. They have the advantage that whereas powders & chemicals haveto be re-applied over and over, an electronic system will last for years. Well perhaps these should be called "scarecats" rather than "scarecrows"... Theidea is that you get a Nature-friendly alternative to smelly, poisonous, or visually disruptive animaldeterrents. Most electronic deterrents work by emitting an ultrasonic alarm triggeredby a motion sensor. The key to it is that the sound is inaudible to humans, but cats, with their betterhearing, will be startled and frightened away by the sound. Although the sound the cat hears is an effectivedeterrent it is in fact harmless to both them and other animals.For over a hundred years a product called "renardine" has been used successfully as a catdeterrent on such places as golf greens, farms, small holdings, parks and playing fields. If you would prefer something more hi-tech but also harmless to cats and all other animals, then thereare a range of electronic cat repellents on the market that can do the job. As well as ultrasonic deterrentsthere are even electronic scarecrows available now that will target trespassing cats with a jet of water! Toms love to leavescent markings to let other cats know their territory. This smell is both offensive and lingering. Manytimes it will lead to more cats coming around - unless you have an effective cat deterrent! Once a cat is in your yard, one strategy is is toset about sowing some doubt in the cat's mind. An old gamekeepers trick is to create some flickeringrandom light reflections as a deterrent. For example you could place some plastic bottles half filledwith water in your borders. The cat sees the distorted reflections, gets spooked, and hopefully slinksaway. Perhaps even more effective (but maybe a bit unsightly) is to string some unwanted CD's togetherwith knots in between to keep them apart. These high tech cat distracters can then be hung across flowerbeds and vegetable plots or hung from trees. (My research shows that cats are most likely to be repelledby old ZZ Top CD 's...). As I’ve mentioned above, there’s no one-size-fits all cat deterrent. Here are some different situations in which a cat deterrent could be useful: