How to Bathe a Cat | Why Certain Cats Need Regular Baths

In general, cats are very good at grooming themselves and will rarely require you to bathe them.
We refer to giving the cat a bath, but in actuality we will be giving him/her a "shower." Place your cat in the tub or sink area. Face the cat away from you to the left or to the right or directly in front, but not facing you. Otherwise, you are giving opportunity for the cat to escape while jumping onto you. By starting your kitty out early and always handling your cats carefully, yet with authority, your cats will learn to tolerate baths and trust you to do the job without causing injury to them. It’s up to you to build that trust. I have bathed many cats that no one else was able to bathe. With practice, you can too.
Hairless cats like Sphynx and Peterbald need to be bathed every week or two.
But bathing cats can definitely be a challenge, what with their aversion to water and all. Here are nine tips on how to bathe a cat so you can make the experience less stressful for both you and your feline friend. We believe that if God had intended us to bathe our own cats he wouldn't have invented groomers!Where should I bathe my cat?I think this Christmas when both kids will be here will be a good time. It does take three people to bathe two cats at the same time.
Except for drinking, you won’t catch most cats coming close to water. The closest thing most felines see to a bath is their own tongue. Although that’s enough for most cats, sometimes they need to be bathed or groomed because they got tangled or for medical reasons. If you’re skeptical or fearful, try these ten […]1. Be selective in how you’ll bathe your cat. Some cats prefer a shower, with their human holding them close. They sometimes find it more soothing than being held only in the arms. Other cats prefer a sink where they can be up high, while others would rather get in the bath tub, although some cats find a faucet aversive. Consider pouring warm water from a cup, or using an extended, flexible nozzle to give yourself more control.Except for drinking, you won’t catch most cats coming close to water. The closest thing most felines see to a bath is their own tongue. Although that’s enough for most cats, sometimes they need to be bathed or groomed because they got tangled or for medical reasons.Although some like or love the water, many cats find baths to be a stressful experience. It’s best if you can start bathing your cat young and get them used to it, but even if you have an older cat that has never been bathed, it can be done without trauma to you or the cat. If your cat is older and has never been bathed, or if you think your cat is going to have a problem with it, it might be best to have a helper. Prepare everything from the temperature of the water to shampoo and towels ahead of time, and remember to stay calm!3. Watch the face. Most cats are afraid of having their faces washed, so only bathe them from the neck down. To clean the face or sensitive areas like the ears, pet wipes are often better tolerated. Unless it upsets the cat, put cotton balls in each ear to protect them from water.We are inside cats. We were bathed once when we first arrived to remove any fleas. Other than that, we are not bathed unless we are very dirty.
I'm the only one in my family who needed an extra bath. I got out of the bedroom before the newly painted walls were dried, and got some paint on me. Yuk!
Of course, if a cat is older or has some physical problems that prevents them from bathing themselves, Mom would bathe whenever it seems necessary.