How to Boost Vitamin B12 Intake for Cats - Pets

The cats with hyperthyroidism had significantly lower cobalamine (B12) levels.
B-12 is given subcutaneously, otherwise known as under the skin---not in the bloodstream. Once you have the loose skin of the cat's neck firmly in your hand, take your opposite hand that holds the syringe and needle and place the needle against the skin just beneath your bunched fingers. This is the spot where skin is already pulled away from muscle and tissue and can guarantee the proper dispensation of the medicine. Push firmly, but gently, until you feel the needle puncture the skin. It is not necessary to continue pushing hard, just slide the needle in another couple of millimeters and empty the syringe, then immediately withdraw the needle. The entire injection should only take seconds.
My Princess cat Is 12 and zwent slowly from 16 to 6 pounds. I thought she had cancer but by a process of elimination (no pun intended) we have deduced that she has
iBD. She is 6.8 now. She is on Pepcid 5 mg daily, methimizole twice daily for hyperthyroid and prednisolone 2 .5 mg twice daily and B12 injection weekly. We now feed ZD low allergen prescription diet. She rarely vomits but has bouts of horrible yellow diarrhea sometimes for a day or two. She has great bloodwork every single time it’s been done with her thyroid levels being within normal limits and her liver showing totally normal values. What about boiled chicken, or drained cooked ground beef (just meat). I won’t do the raw diet. She gets a little wet food twice a day. I have four other cats too. I was hoping for some information on acupressure points for cats for bowel issues if you have any links. For use as a supplemental nutritive source of vitamin B12 in cattle, horses, swine, sheep, dogs and cats.Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) Deficiency: An Important Component of Gastrointestinal Disease in Cats. Published article by Dr. Arnold Plotnick.T1 - Subnormal concentrations of serum cobalamin (Vitamin B12) in cats with gastrointestinal disease
For otherwise healthy cats, using a supplement specifically formulated for diabetic cats such as Methyl B12 can help with overall wellness and is well advised since just like humans do, cats stop producing B12 as they age. (LifeLink, the manufacturer of Zobaline is one of DCC's Affiliate Partners and we earn a small commission on sales to help fund site costs when purchases are made by direct click-thru from the link on) If health issues are more severe, then the injectable form available from your vet would likely be a better solution for your cat, however this will likely be the Cobalamin form rather than Methyl B12. The Cobalamin form must break down in the system in order for the Methyl B12 to be released. For otherwise healthy cats, using a supplement specifically formulated for diabetic cats such as Methyl B12 can help with overall wellness and is well advised since just like humans do, cats stop producing B12 as they age. (LifeLink, the manufacturer of Zobaline is one of DCC's Affiliate Partners and we earn a small commission on sales to help fund site costs when purchases are made by direct click-thru from the link on) If health issues are more severe, then the injectable form available from your vet would likely be a better solution for your cat, however this will likely be the Cobalamin form rather than Methyl B12. The Cobalamin form must break down in the system in order for the Methyl B12 to be released. For otherwise healthy cats, using a supplement specifically formulated for diabetic cats such as Methyl B12 can help with overall wellness and is well advised since just like humans do, cats stop producing B12 as they age. (LifeLink, the manufacturer of Zobaline is one of DCC's Affiliate Partners and we earn a small commission on sales to help fund site costs when purchases are made by direct click-thru from the link on) If health issues are more severe, then the injectable form available from your vet would likely be a better solution for your cat, however this will likely be the Cobalamin form rather than Methyl B12. The Cobalamin form must break down in the system in order for the Methyl B12 to be released. My 12 year old cat is diabetic and is currently on a twice a day insulin dosage. For the past several months he has been experiencing problems walking (walking on the hocks of his back legs, condition neuropathy) which is common if the blood glucose levels are not regulated. I read on the internet that some diabetic cats with neuropathy have shown improvement within a couple of weeks with Methyl B12 injections. I asked my vet about this and they gave me regular B12 injections to administer. I understand that the B12 I have is not the correct B12 form that has been shown to improve neuropathy symptoms in cats.