Imodium A-D is an over-the-counter anti-diarrheal medication.

An anti-diarrhoeal drug is any medication which provides symptomatic relief for diarrhoea
It’s not uncommon for addicts to seek out alternative ways to achieve a similar high, says Edwin Salsitz, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. "Opioid receptors are distributed throughout the body," he explains. When loperamide is taken correctly, it only works on the opioid receptors in the GI tract to counter diarrhea symptoms. But when the medication is taken in large quantitiesaround 200 milligrams, or 25 times the maximum approved daily doseit doesn't stay strictly in the colon, and travels to other areas of the body, he says. "Users want the drug to get into the brain's receptors for that sense of euphoria."
May 5, 2016 - Imodium A-D is an over-the-counter anti-diarrheal medication
An officer interviewed Harper who provided a written statement, allegedly confessing that he stole anti-diarrhea medication from five different businesses on various occasions. Harper reportedly went on to tell the officer that he is a quote “recovering heroin addict,” Anti Diarrheal Medication | Zee MedicalDiarrhea Medication: Antibiotic and antiparasitics agents, VaccinesOct 25, 2016 - Ask about anti-diarrheal medications
Police found the 32-year-old man Aug. 28 in his Allentown home surrounded by empty packets of an anti-diarrhea medication, and tests showed he took so much of the over-the-counter medicine, which contains opioids, that it reached toxic levels and killed him, authorities say.This one makes our stomachs hurt. According to a new report published online in the , drug addicts who are running dry on like Oxycontin and Vicodin are turning to over-the-counter Immodium, an anti-diarrhea medication, for a high.Coroner Scott Grim and Allentown police would not comment on any details of Alexis' death, and the coroner's report in Northampton County lists no deaths caused by a loperamide overdose. But experts say opioid addicts across the nation are turning to widely available anti-diarrhea medication to get high or help ease withdrawal symptoms.Loperamide is the generic name for an over-the-counter and prescription medication used to treat diarrhea. It is sold under such brand names as Imodium, Diamode, Imogen, Kao-Paverin, Imotil and Imperim. It can be used by itself or in combination with other medications to help stop diarrhea. It does this by reducing the speed at which the intestines move food through your system. Bismuth subsalicylate is another OTC anti-diarrhea medication sold under such brand names as Pepto Bismol, Kapectolin, Kaopectate, Diotame, Helidac and Kola-Pectin. Both types of anti-diarrhea medications can produce side effects, but only rarely. Some people are taking extremely large doses of the anti-diarrhea medication Imodium in an attempt to get high, or to self-treat an addiction to painkillers, in what experts call a dangerous but growing trend.It's not uncommon for addicts to seek out alternative ways to achieve a similar high, says Edwin Salsitz, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. "Opioid receptors are distributed throughout the body," he explains. When loperamide is taken correctly, it only works on the opioid receptors in the GI tract to counter diarrhea symptoms. But when the medication is taken in large quantities-around 200 milligrams, or 25 times the maximum approved daily dose-it doesn't stay strictly in the colon, and travels to other areas of the body, he says. "Users want the drug to get into the brain's receptors for that sense of euphoria."